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At what point do you take girls out of school altogether because boys can’t handle it?

Parent of a female teen whose school banned leggings

#yesallwomen have a right to an education without fashion policing by sexist administrators

(via meetingsinthedesert)

^ this, tho… the message in these ridiculous dress codes remains “boys deserve an undistracted education, and you-GIRL-are a distraction… and your education comes second. You should be grateful, anyway… it’s really more than you deserve.” and i actually am not going to repeat how it reinforces rape culture because really, i’m just so damn tired of the messages we send young women about being nothing more than an accesory in a man’s life… fuck that. and fuck awful myopic dress codes… (via ginandbird)

This parent is right.  The school is sending a message that girls’ clothes are supposed to distract boys; that boys can use them as an excuse, that girls when assaulted should blame themselves because they must have worn the wrong thing, because their clothes made them unfit to mingle with their peers.  Have I got that right? (rhetorical)

(via pewpewlazernipples )

All of the above, and additionally, has anyone actually asked the male students about this? I doubt it - this is grown adults deciding what it is about underage girls’ clothing that is ‘too distracting’ (ie, too sexy), which is a whole new level of ‘ew’.

(via pantheraj)

That’s what it really comes down to. No male student’s viewpoint was taken into account here, I guarantee it. This is adults censoring (girl) children, it’s in the same vein as ‘protect your daughter’s purity’ cultural mores, it’s “we think there is something fundamentally wrong about a girl’s body and we need to start teaching her this NOW”, and yes it involves full-grown school officials sexualizing young girls and policing them for it. It’s gross on several levels.

(via thegirlwithgoldeyes)

medievalpoc:

Medievalpoc Presents: History of POC in Math and Science Week, 8-3-14 through 8-9-14!

Medievalpoc’s first Patreon Milestone Goal has been reached, and the History of POC in Math and Science Week is happening soon! This all-new themed week will focus on the contribution of people of color to the fields of mathematics, science, physics, medicine, natural philosophy, and much, much more!

There will be a focus on primary documents with interactive elements, visual and documentary evidence, innovators and their biographies, and notable personages of color from the Islamic Golden Age, Medieval Europe, African Empires and Universities, Asian images and texts, and discussion about early modern globalization regarding how this knowledge traveled.

If you have an article, image, document, or commentary you would like to submit, here’s your chance to weigh in on this topic! Please use the “Math and Science Week” and any other relevant tags for your submission, and I look forward to hearing about your favorite mathematicians and scientists of color!

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

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